Thorpe Green, Surrey

After a stormy night this morning dawned bright and breezey and I walked to nearby Thorpe Green. It always brings to mind Enid Blyton summer holiday reading from childhood and rightly or not is how I imagined the south of England.

The Rose and Crown is a popular pub, especially on weekends during the summer when it’s difficult to book a table and the garden is overflowing.

Cricket isn’t played on the green, which is a pity because it looks a perfect setting although the land is quite wet.

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Behind the bank of trees marking the boundary of the green is this hidden gem. Although it all looks tranquil the peace is disturbed by the passage of planes overhead and the sound of the M25 that runs alongside the resevoir.

 

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Heather Garden

I was lucky to hit a sunny period between heavy showers and storms when I went for a walk last week. As I entered the heather garden I noticed two robins washing themselves in puddles and was fortunate enough to get a picture of one of them.

The light was strange and most of my shots were over-exposed but the blend of nature’s colours was breath-taking. After so much rain this month, the grass is lush and very green, which contrasts brilliantly with the purple heather and the red berries that are appearing on various trees.

Borough Market

I visited Borough Market last week. It’s the first time I’ve been this year and although some of the photographs I took didn’t have many people visible,  it was very busy with the usual vibrant atmosphere.

As the London Bridge attacks began on the 3rd June 2017, I was walking south across Waterloo Bridge on my way home with my family after seeing the musical, 42nd Street. We were all happy and still buzzing from the spectacle of the previous few hours but were alerted to danger by the sight of hundreds of emergency vehicles with their blue lights causing the night sky to take on a different hue, pouring south across the Thames. The sound of sirens filled the air as we picked up speed to escape our very vulnerable position mid-way across the bridge. Not only were the vehicles pouring south over Waterloo Bridge, but looking up and down stream, we could see the same thing happening on the bridges in both directions. Looking over our shoulders we saw that the Embankment also had a stream of blue-lighted vehicles progressing rapidly towards the danger.

It was too early for news to have broken in the media but we sensed danger and got off the bridge as quickly as possible, opting to avoid crowds by crossing the roof of the Hayward Gallery. From this vantage point we could see nothing, but the sound of the sirens being deflected off taller buildings, became deafening.

Until we reached ground level we had no idea whether we were walking into danger or not as we were unable to pinpoint the direction the vehicles were heading. Once we descended the steps we realised we were probably safe as we met no crowds of people fleeing.

As we approached Waterloo Station we walked past several restaurants full of people enjoying a Saturday night out and everything in the station appeared normal. As we waited for a train we looked on Twitter and found early reports of the horrors that had been happening a short distance away. At that time it was thought that a third attack was happening at Vauxhall, a station we pass through on our way to and from London. This was later reported to be unconnected but at the time it added to our sense of unease and anxiety. Being unable to settle once we reached home, we sat and watched as the media began to broadcast reports from the multiple scenes.

As hours and days passed I was able to put my experience into some sort of cohesive order. Despite the horror everyone feels upon hearing of these atrocities, certain things stand out. The thing that I was most struck by was the bravery of the first responders who, in these situations, run into danger. I know they train for this and are better equipped to deal with it than members of the public but it runs against every natural instinct of a human being.

My family and I found ourselves on the fringes of this particular attack but we weren’t in any danger. We went to a show, walked to the station and boarded a train home, but our proximity to the danger emphasizes how much a part chance plays in these things. If we’d been to a different theatre we may have been walking over London Bridge or if the attackers had chosen Waterloo Bridge we’d have been caught up in events. Although I am more alert, I intend to continue visiting London regularly and applaud the crowds of people I saw this week doing exactly the same thing.

Flowers

It was a beautiful morning for a walk with a clear blue sky and fresh breeze.The light was good for taking photgraphs.

Flora and Fauna

I read this week that the temperatures this August have been below average. This is the only month this year to be cooler than average. It has also been wet, as have eight of the past thirteen Augusts. As I have noted before this has resulted in very early signs of autumn.

Some of the photo’s I took this week reflect this but in others the bright green grass makes it look more like spring.

 

Walking along this valley a movement caught my eye and I stopped when this small deer came in sight. My stillness was rewarded when another one followed and I was able to take photo’s as they crossed to the trees on the other side, grazing as they went. As I was about to move on a bigger deer appeared. This one seemed more wary and after checking all around, it quickly galloped across the grass to join the others before disappearing into the trees.

London

One of the things that sets London apart from other major cities is the amount of green space. There are several well-know parks such as Hyde Park as well as a multitude of squares. Walking through London you often come across one of these beautiful tranquil squares within a stones throw of the bustle of the city.

I often cross the river and from the Embankment cut through Lincoln’s Inn and am always amazed at the contrast between the area containing the Inns of Court and the busy roads that intersect it.

Narrow paths and alleys criss cross the area, some still having cobbles to walk on. The architecture is fascinating with many different styles and various decorations that signify the wealth of the companies that built them.

Traversing these walkways you come across many small squares, usually containing some type of garden whether formal or informal and the sound of birdsong is easily heard above the muted roar of the city in the background.

Legoland

A couple of years ago I accompanied some friends to Legoland. Theme Parks don’t appeal to me but the model village constructed here is interesting and well worth a look. A team of people design and create these buildings and provide the maintenance throughout the months the park is open.

Here are a few of the photo’s I took, some of them almost look like the real thing!

 

Signs of Autumn

Walking this morning I was struck by how autumnal it looked. Weather forecasters tell us that meteorologically speaking, autumn begins in August, and although it is still July, there were definite signs of autumn everywhere I looked.

The fact that the day was overcast heightened this feeling as well as the strong breeze but also the beginnings of warmer colours amongst the leaves on the trees as well as an abundance of golden, dead leaves beneath them. I even caught sight of ripe berries in the hedges.

Here are some of the images I captured.

Osterley Park

I visited Osterley Park on a very cool June day that was in marked contrast to the high temperatures of the previous and succeeding weeks. Although it isn’t a huge self contained estate it has an impressively large house and extensive grounds.

Having driven along suburban streets and past Heathrow, with planes skimming the top of the car as they came in to land, entering the grounds seemed like stepping into the past. A drive threaded it’s way through verdant parkland with animals grazing and a range of old farm buildings.

Walking from the car park I passed a lake with lots of wildfowl and birds calling, but their songs were drowned out every few minutes by the roar of aeroplanes flying low overhead. Through the trees I caught a glimpse of the mansion, which looked blank and cold and contrasted sharply with the stables, part of which had been converted into a gift shop and restaurant. I was able to look round the ground floor of the house but found the insistance of the volunteer guides to explain every detail to everyone passing through, somewhat irritating. The highlight was a room without a guide but with a spinning top game that visitors were encouraged to use.

Osterley Park has often been used as a location for film and television including an early episode of Dr Who and films such as The Young Victoria and The Dark Knight Rises.

As it was such a chilly day I decided to have a warm drink before wandering through the gardens and thought that it would be a lovely tranquil place exept for the planes seemingly endless flight above.

 

 

Flowers and Views North Yorkshire

I visited North Yorkshire last weekend and was invited for breakfast at a ‘hidden gem’ near Crayke. The breakfast was delicious and included pancakes cooked in the way I remember from childhood.

The owner used to look after the Museum Gardens in York, and has created a beautiful natural garden around the cafe.

Here are some of the things I saw that day.

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